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Explore the Xraise Media Center

With all the distractions around us it can sometimes be refreshing to get science delivered right to us in an easily digestible medium. That’s why we like to capture action on camera. Here you’ll find videos celebrating our laboratory, the science we do, and the fun how-to activities to try on your own!

Who would have thunk that you could levitate stuff on sound waves? Magic!

Slater Harrison, aka Sciencetoymaker

Video Center

JunkGenies with Xraise

During the past semester two undergraduates have been working on a series of short videos explaining, in a publicly digestible way, the science behind our synchrotron-science-related exhibits. Watch JunkGenies project in a way that elucidates the synchrotron science connection and our partnership with the Physics Bus.

Ultrasonic Levitation

This is a fun way to levitate stuff if you want to stay within the laws of physics. A standing wave, at around 40khz, is set up between a piezo transducer and a flat surface. Small styrofoam beads get trapped in the nodes of this wave! Thanks to YouTube user mikeselectricstuff for his how-to video and schematic!

The Science at CLASSE

Concordia High School student and summer intern Johnathan Chen describes his search for the answers to fundamental questions about the universe during time at the Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-based Sciences and Education.

Dolphin Ring

A compilation of air-entrained underwater ring vortices created by these 2-liter bottle and take-out-container.

Evolution of X-ray Crystallography

Elizabeth Brandt, a Concordia High School student and CHESS summer intern, assembles information on the evolution of x-ray crystallography on this very informative website.

Picture Gallery

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National Science Foundation

Xraise is supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences under NSF award DMR-1332208.

CHESS is operated and managed for the National Science Foundation by Cornell University.